Share your hot weather riding tips

There is no avoiding it. It’s going to get hot.

This winter you shared your tips for surviving sub-freezing weather, but now we’ll have to switch gears. On Thursday, forecasters are saying the high will be 96 degrees.

What suggestions do you have for surviving the heat? The obvious suggestions are to ride early, drink a lot of water and wear sunscreen, but what other ways do you beat the heat when you can’t avoid the afternoon sun?

Here are a few things I do:

I keep a change of clothes in my bag along with baby wipes to clean up with when I make it to work.

I try to lock up my bike in the shade so it isn’t on fire when I come back out.

I’m considering getting/making this portable misting system to keep Luci and me cool.

Share your tips in the comment section.

 

13 comments
Sue Ingram
Sue Ingram

 The only thing I focus on doing when riding in such heat is to head for the forest instead on the open road or such. Especially if the forest is indigenous trees rather than pine or gum trees which seem to sap the moisture from the air! Plenty sunscreen and lip gloss too for reapplication.

motorcycle parts
motorcycle parts

In summers i used to avoid bike rides mostly in the daytime,as the heat is on full swing... but if i have to do the ride then i always try to cover my face with a wet cotton clothe,so that it helps me in breathing easily..

noah
noah

Take the Eddy Merckx approach: ride lots. Your body will acclimate with time and while you won't be any cooler, you won't be as uncomfortable.

Tucson Pedaler
Tucson Pedaler

Ride faster to create more wind chill. Seriously, I like to get early and go up Mt Lemmon. If you get past Windy Vista before the sun comes up it is never to hot. Once you get to Ski Valley doing repeat back and forth to Summerhaven is nice. If that is to much work ride to the service station on Camp Lowell and Swan and they have a huge walk in cooler for the beverages. Grab an ice cream come and go in there and eat it.

Dan
Dan

1. I acclimate myself to the heat somewhat by keeping the house and office around above 80 F. This has the side benefit of making all the outdoors seem more inviting through the summer. 2. I ride slower and on quieter streets. 9 months I take Broadway (25-30 mph) for a 6 mile commute. 3 months I take the 3rd street bike path (10 - 15 mph). The difference nearly doubles the commute time. 3. Electric bike. When it gets crazy hot or if I am a little sick I take a backup bike with a Bionx kit on it. After commuting daily for a year I sold my car, planning that the bus would be my backup. But last July I bought a used Bionx kit and put it on a spare bike. It has worked out much better. I can arrive at work on hot days just barely braking a sweat and if I don't feel well it gets me there in the same time but will little effort. My primary motivation for cycling the commute is to build in exercise so most of the year I only use it a day or two each month.

Sanderskd
Sanderskd

Hey Dan Bion X Dealer Saskatchewan Canada What kind of Bion X unit do you have and what type of bike do you have it on ?

Martha Retallick
Martha Retallick

I'm with ya, Dan! I don't turn my cooler on unless it's at least 85 degrees in my house. Which probably means that a lot of readers are saying, "Note to self: Avoid Martha's house until the fall."

Patrick
Patrick

A loose fitting long sleeve shirt & loose fitting pants or shorts work well for me. Also, a wet bandana draped over the back of my head & neck (under my helmet) makes for excellent evaporative cooling and blocks the sun.

Martha Retallick
Martha Retallick

I cover up. It may look like it's hotter to wear long sleeves and tights instead of shorts, but it's not. Also means that you use less sun-goop, er, sunscreen.

Colby
Colby

No shower at work, so I keep clothes at work and do the truck-stop shower in the sink when I get there. Sometimes it helps to make a stop at the bagel shop near the office for a pre-cooldown, grab an iced coffee and read the paper. For the ride home in the afternoon, no matter what you do, it's hot (and muggy during the monsoon season) so it's just a mental game - I'm with Mtngoat - tough it out- RAWR!

Rottencommie
Rottencommie

I've read about vests that hold ice or cold water to keep your torso cool, and that even some pro cyclists use them. I've always wanted to try one but I feel like it's not really necessary unless I'm doing long rides every day. You can also get neck wraps that you can freeze. I typically just do what every one else does - nearly-frozen water/gatorade in my bottles and when I get to work, I drink a ton of ice water and then take a cold shower. I'm lucky to have a shower where I work.

Mtngoat
Mtngoat

Dealing with the cold is always easier than heat for me. As I say, you can always put more clothes ON but you can only take so many OFF. One tip: When it gets really, really hot I usually soak my jersey or shirt before I ride. Always dry by the time I get where I am going, but the first half of my ride is a lot nicer that way. Other than that, I just tell myself how tough I am for being a year-round bike commuter in Tucson. RAWR.

Jeffthearchitect
Jeffthearchitect

i may be in michigan . not AZ ... but is has been in the 90's for the past couple weeks ! . i am just leaving on todays ride and thought i'd check for a couple tips ... i sometimes spray some water on me before i leave - today i will soak my jersey . and maybe do it once or twice on the ride :) . happy cycling !